Draft and Final Trustee Implementation Group Restoration Plans will be posted on this page for public review. Below you will find links to download documents.

The Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group is seeking public input on a draft restoration plan proposing an investment of up to $2 billion in the Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion project. If approved, the large-scale project would reconnect the Mississippi River to Louisiana’s Barataria Basin. The project will allow the controlled release of freshwater, nutrients and sediment back into the basin to rebuild wetlands and contribute to the broader restoration of its ecosystem.

The Draft Phase II Restoration Plan #3.2 is available for public comment for 60 days through May 4, 2021, with virtual public meetings to present the draft plan and draft environmental impact statement April 6, 7, and 8, 2021. The draft plan evaluates six design alternatives for the diversion project and identifies one of them as preferred.

NOAA and the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA) are lead Trustees for the draft plan, which was prepared jointly with the other Louisiana Restoration Area Trustees.

Concurrent with release of the draft restoration plan, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is releasing a draft environmental impact statement, also available for public comment for 60 days. The environmental impact statement and information on how to submit comments are on the Army Corps’ website.

Reducing Land Loss Exacerbated by the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

Louisiana and the Barataria Basin are in the midst of a land loss crisis. The Basin has lost more than 276,000 acres of land since the 1930s. Wetlands in the Basin were the most heavily impacted by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, which accelerated a severe land loss trend threatening Louisiana’s estuaries. The oil spill and response activities significantly accelerated the rate of wetland loss in the area.

The project would restore and sustain a significant amount of wetland habitat—tens of thousands of acres—and the resources that depend on them, over the next several decades. At peak capacity, the proposed preferred alternative would transport up to 75,000 cubic feet per second of freshwater and its sediment and nutrients—harnessing nature through engineering to re-establish the natural process that originally built Louisiana’s coastal wetlands.

Draft Restoration Plan Comment Period and Virtual Public Meetings

Public comments will be accepted for 60 days through May 4. We encourage you to review and comment on the draft plan by submitting comments online, by mail, or during virtual public meetings listed below.

  • Online: https://parkplanning.nps.gov/MBSD
  • Mail:
    S. Army Corps of Engineers, New Orleans District
    Attn: CEMVN-OD-SE, MVN-2012-2806-EOO
    7400 Leake Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70118

We are co-hosting virtual public meetings with the Army Corps of Engineers on April 6 – 8, 2021. We will present information on the draft plan, and the Army Corps will present on the draft environmental impact statement.

  • Dates/Times:
    April 6, 2021 at 9:00 a.m. CT
    April 7, 2021 at 1:00 p.m. CT
    April 8, 2021 at 6:00 p.m. CT
  • Meeting Registration

Virtual Community Conversations with Environmental Law Institute and the Restore the Mississippi River Delta

The Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group, CPRA, and the Environmental Law Institute have partnered to host a dialogue—facilitated by the Restore the Mississippi River Delta—to provide information on the Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion.

These virtual meetings will provide the public with an informal opportunity to learn and ask questions about the project and the permitting process. CPRA and Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group members will guide participants through the recently released draft environmental statement and draft restoration plan.  We will also discuss how participants can participate in the upcoming formal public meetings and submit formal public comments.

These meetings are not an opportunity to comment formally on the draft restoration plan and draft environmental impact statement, like the meetings scheduled for April 6 – 8. These virtual community conversations are a chance to better understand the two documents and the Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion project through a dialogue with the participating organizations.

Additional Background Information and Documents

Recognizing the loss of marsh productivity caused by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and the importance of Louisiana’s marshes to the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem, the historic 2016 Natural Resource Damages settlement allocated almost half of the funding, $4 billion, to restoring Louisiana’s coastal and nearshore habitats.

In 2017, the Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group released a draft and in 2018 approved a final strategic restoration plan prioritizing large-scale sediment diversion, marsh creation, and ridge restoration techniques and approaches for the Barataria Basin. The strategic plan included the Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion and other projects for evaluation and planning.

     Documents and More Information

We’ll send emails out to Gulf Spill Restoration subscribers when any of this information is updated. If you’re not signed up, please do that today (via NOAA Fisheries).

The Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group has released its Final Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment #7: Wetlands, Coastal, and Nearshore Habitats, and Birds. We accepted comment from August 20, 2020 through September 22, 2020 and held a public meeting on September 2, 2020.

The plan includes projects that restore the Wetlands, Coastal, and Nearshore Habitats and Birds restoration types. It includes five projects which have a total estimated cost of $234.6 million. The selected alternatives are:

Wetlands, Coastal, and Nearshore Habitat:

Grande Cheniere Ridge Marsh Creation – This project will create up to 624 acres of marsh near Bayou Grande Cheniere and approximately 12,480 linear feet of earthen ridge along Jefferson Canal. The project estimated cost is $65 million.
Terrebonne Basin Ridge and Marsh Creation Project: Bayou Terrebonne Increment – This project will create up to 1,430 acres of brackish and saline marsh and restore up to 80 acres of earthen ridge. The estimated project cost is $157 million.
Bird’s Foot Delta Hydrologic Restoration – This project provides engineering and design funding for restoration anticipated to restore the hydrology of the Mississippi River Bird’s Foot Delta by dredging parts of Pass-a-Loutre, South Pass, and Southeast Pass to reconnect the Mississippi River with the marshes of the eastern and central Bird’s Foot Delta. The estimated engineering and design cost is $6 million.

Birds:

Isle au Pitre Restoration – This project provides engineering and design funding for restoration anticipated to enhance nesting conditions on the existing island by elevating portions of the island with dredged sediment and planting suitable vegetation for nesting brown pelicans and wading birds, shell rakes for American oystercatchers, and shell or small limestone on the perimeter of the island for tern and black skimmer nesting habitat. The estimated engineering and design cost is $3.5 million.
Terrebonne Houma Navigation Channel (HNC) Island Restoration –This project provides engineering and design funding for restoration anticipated to enlarge the island from its current size of 32 acres to approximately 50 acres by importing dredged sediment from a nearby suitable sand source and disposing of it adjacent and onto the existing island. The estimated engineering and design cost is $3.1 million.

Final Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment #7: Wetlands, Coastal, and Nearshore Habitats, and Birds

The Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group has approved the Final Phase 2 Restoration Plan/Environmental Assessment #1.2: Spanish Pass Ridge and Marsh Creation Project and Lake Borgne Marsh Creation Project.

We released the draft restoration plan in October 2019 and accepted public comment through November 20, 2019. This final plan includes construction activities for the restoration of wetlands, coastal, and nearshore habitats injured in the Louisiana Restoration Area as a result of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The plan analyzes restoration project design alternatives for two projects that are components of larger marsh restoration strategies, and were approved for engineering and design (E&D) in a previous restoration plan. We have selected and approved a design alternative for construction of each, with a combined construction cost of approximately $214,932,290.

The Spanish Pass project is a component of an overall large-scale restoration strategy for the Barataria Basin that will re-establish ridge and intertidal marsh habitats degraded due to sea level rise, land subsidence, diminished sediment supply, and storm events. The primary goal of the Spanish Pass increment in this plan is to create and nourish approximately 132 acres of historical ridge and 1,683 acres of marsh. This Plan approves funding for construction, engineering and design, operations and maintenance, and monitoring and adaptive management with an estimated cost of approximately $100.3 million.

The Lake Borgne Marsh Creation – Increment One project is also a component of an overall large-scale restoration strategy for the Pontchartrain Basin that will reestablish the bay rim and intertidal marsh habitat. This increment will create an estimated 2,816 acres of restored marsh habitat at an estimated cost of approximately $114.7 million. This Plan approved funding for engineering and design, construction, operations and maintenance, and monitoring and adaptive management.

Final Phase 2 Restoration Plan/Environmental Assessment #1.2: Spanish Pass Ridge and Marsh Creation Project and Lake Borgne Marsh Creation Project

The Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group has released its Draft Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment #7: Wetlands, Coastal, and Nearshore Habitats, and Birds. We will accept comments through September 22, 2020.

The draft plan includes proposed projects that restore the Wetlands, Coastal and Nearshore Habitat and Birds restoration types. It includes five proposed preferred alternatives which have a total estimated cost of $234.1 million. The proposed preferred alternatives are:

Birds:

  • Isle au Pitre Restoration – This project would enhance nesting conditions on the existing island by elevating portions of the island with dredged sediment and planting suitable vegetation for nesting brown pelicans and wading birds, long strips of deposited shell (shell rakes) for American oystercatchers, and shell or small limestone on the perimeter of the island for tern and black skimmer nesting habitat. The estimated project cost is $3.5 million (cost is E&D only).
  • Terrebonne Houma Navigation Channel (HNC) Island Restoration –This project would enlarge the island from its current size of 32 acres to approximately 50 acres by importing dredged sediment from a nearby suitable sand source and disposing of it adjacent and onto the existing island. The estimated project cost is $3.1 million (cost is E&D only).

Wetlands, Coastal and Nearshore Habitat:

  • Grande Cheniere Ridge Marsh Creation – This project would create up to 624 acres of marsh near Bayou Grande Cheniere, approximately 12,480 linear feet of earthen ridge along Jefferson Canal, and approximately 48,900 linear feet of earthen containment dike. The estimated project cost is $65 million.
  • Terrebonne Basin Ridge and Marsh Creation Project: Bayou Terrebonne Increment – This project would create up to 1,430 acres of brackish and saline marsh and restore up to 80 acres of earthen ridge. The estimated project cost is $156.5 million.
  • Bird’s Foot Delta Hydrologic Restoration – This project would restore the hydrology of the Mississippi River Bird’s Foot Delta by dredging Pass-a-Loutre, South Pass, and Southeast Pass to reconnect the Mississippi River with the marshes of the eastern and central Bird’s Foot Delta. The estimated project cost is $6 million (cost is for E&D only).

The restoration plan also includes two non-preferred alternatives, which are not summarized here.

A public webinar will be held on September 3, 2020 at 3:00 pm Central Standard Time to present the draft restoration plan and the proposed preferred alternatives. If you are unable to attend the webinar, the materials will be posted online shortly after the webinar on the Louisiana Restoration Area web page.

Public Comment Period

Public comments, accepted through September 22, 2020, can be submitted online and through the mail.

September 3 Webinar

We will conduct a public webinar on September 3, 2019 at 3:00 p.m. Central Standard Time. Please register for the webinar at our GoToWebinar registration page.

After registering, participants will receive a confirmation with directions for joining the webinar. A GoToWebinar system check is recommended before attending.

Draft Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment #7: Wetlands, Coastal, and Nearshore Habitats, and Birds

Draft Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment #7: Fact sheet

Draft Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment #7: Fact sheet Vietnamese

The Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group has approved the Final Restoration Plan/Environmental Assessment #5: Living Coastal and Marine Resources – Marine Mammals and Oysters.

We released the draft restoration plan in March 2020 and accepted public comment through April 20, 2020. This final plan will replenish and protect living coastal and marine resources (specifically, oysters and marine mammals) in the Louisiana Restoration Area. One project approved in the plan will focus on increasing capacity to respond to marine mammal strandings, and the other three will focus on oyster restoration in the Louisiana Restoration Area.

We released the draft restoration plan in March 2020 and accepted public comment through April 20, 2020. This final plan will replenish and protect living coastal and marine resources (specifically, oysters and marine mammals) in the Louisiana Restoration Area. One project approved in the plan will focus on increasing capacity to respond to marine mammal strandings, and the other three will focus on oyster restoration in the Louisiana Restoration Area.

Marine Mammal Project

The marine mammal project will increase capacity and expand partnerships along the Louisiana coastline for marine mammal stranding response.

  • Increased capacity will lead to improved rapid response to injured and dead dolphins and whales, and a better understanding of the causes of injury and/or death.
  • A Louisiana-based stranding coordinator will build partnerships and conduct outreach for the project.
  • Finally, the project will provide infrastructure, equipment, and supplies needed for stranding and rehabilitation.
  • Estimated cost of this project is $3,095,628.

This project will be led by NOAA in partnership with other federal and state trustees on the Louisiana TIG.

Oyster Projects

A network of oyster reefs will be constructed to increase spawning oyster populations.

  • This project will be done in two phases, the first includes construction of two reefs in the Lake Machais/Mozambique Point area and two in the Petit Pass/Bay Boudreaux area, each up to 10 acres in size and 1.2 m from bottom.
  • The second phase will identify and construct additional spawning stock reefs in areas of Louisiana public oyster grounds with suitable conditions for oyster propagation but larval supplies are low.
  • All constructed reefs from this project would be closed to harvest, but located near harvesting areas to promote habitat connectivity.
  • Estimated cost of this project is $9,701,447.

Oyster reefs will be created through placement of limestone cultch material.

  • Material will be placed in two locations, the first is a 200-acre site in the Grand Banks area of Mississippi Sound.
  • The second location is at a 200-acre site in Caillou Lake Public Oyster Seed Reservation.
  • We will also identify and construct additional reefs in areas of Louisiana public oyster grounds with suitable conditions for oyster propagation but lack sufficient substrate for oyster populations to expand.
  • Harvest at these sites will be closed until performance criteria are met.
  • Estimated cost of this project is $10,070,000.

The Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group will provide funding to support operations at the Michael C. Voisin Oyster Hatchery in Grand Isle, Louisiana.

  • Project activities include production, deployment, and monitoring of hatchery-produced oysters onto established reefs within Louisiana’s public oyster areas that are low-producing or in need of rehabilitation.
  • The hatchery estimates production of at least 500 million oyster larvae per year.
  • A minimum of 25 percent of the oyster larvae produced would be dedicated for oyster restoration activities in protected areas.
  • Estimated cost of this project is $5,850,000.

All three oyster projects will be led by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife & Fisheries in partnership with federal and state trustees on the Louisiana TIG. The total $25,621,447 funding proposed for implementation of oyster restoration under the trustees’ preferred alternatives represents a commitment of all remaining available funding for oyster restoration in the Louisiana Restoration Area.

The Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group has approved the Final Phase II Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment #3.3: Large-scale Barataria Marsh Creation: Upper Barataria Component.

The project was initially evaluated for engineering and design funding in the 2018 Strategic Restoration Plan for Barataria Basin. We then released the draft restoration plan in March 2020 and accepted public comment through April 17, 2020. The approximate 1,200 acre marsh creation project approved in the plan will be implemented by NOAA, in partnership with other federal and state trustees on the Louisiana TIG.

  • The project includes filling areas to create an intertidal marsh platform that will support marsh plants and support healthy wetland habitat, which can lessen the impact of future storms by dissipating wave energy.
  • The project will use approximately 8.4 million cubic yards of sediment dredged from the Mississippi River.
  • A single construction phase will be used to maximize cost effectiveness. The estimated construction duration is 26 months. Bids are expected to be solicited by NOAA in 2021.
  • The total estimated cost is approximately $176 million, including previous design efforts.

This project is intended to continue the process of using restoration funding to restore and conserve wetlands, coastal, and nearshore habitats in the Barataria Basin, where the greatest oiling impacts from the Deepwater Horizon spill occurred. The trustees will continue to consider and plan for additional wetlands, coastal and nearshore habitat restoration projects in the future

Final Phase II Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment #3.3: Large-scale Barataria Marsh Creation: Upper Barataria Component

The Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group has approved the Final Supplemental Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment for the Cypremort Point State Park Improvements Project Modifications. The modifications include replacing the original proposed breakwater system project feature with other recreational use features.

We released the draft supplemental restoration plan and environmental assessment for this project on April 17, 2020 and accepted public comment for 30 days.

The Cypremort Improvements Project modifications, as evaluated in the final supplemental plan, include an RV campground with approximately 30 new paved pull-through campsites with sewer, water, and electrical tie-ins; two mobile bathhouses with sewer, water, and electrical tie-ins; and a boat dock/fishing pier. The project also includes improvements to an existing rock jetty, beach reclamation, construction of a marsh boardwalk and trail, and road and parking lot repairs at Cypremort Point State Park.

The estimated cost of these improvements is $4.48 million.

The project improvements are intended to continue the process of using restoration funding to enhance recreational activities and amenities injured by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The project is consistent with the restoration alternatives selected in the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Final Programmatic Damage Assessment and Restoration Plan/Programmatic Environmental Impact.

Final Supplemental Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment for the Cypremort Point State Park Improvements Project Modifications

The Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group has released a Draft Supplemental Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment for the Cypremort Point State Park Improvements Project Modifications. The modifications under consideration include replacing the original proposed breakwater system project feature with other recreational use features. The Cypremort Project, with the breakwater system, was initially approved in the July 2018 Final Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment #4 and had an estimated cost of $4.48 million. Since Restoration Plan #4 was approved, an alternative source of funds was found for the breakwater system.

The Draft Supplemental Restoration Plan/Environmental Assessment evaluates three action alternatives:

  • Alternative A includes the components of the original Cypremort Improvements Project that were approved for funding but are not currently completed: improvements to an existing rock jetty, beach reclamation, construction of a marsh boardwalk and trail, and road and parking lot repairs.
  • Alternative B, the preferred alternative, includes the same components as in Alternative A and a new set of improvements at Cypremort Point State Park: an RV campground with approximately 30 new paved pull-through campsites with sewer, water, and electrical tie-ins; two mobile bathhouses with sewer, water, and electrical tie-ins; and a boat dock/fishing pier.
  • Alternative C includes the same components as Alternative B but eliminates the mobile bathhouses.

The estimated cost of the preferred alternative, Alternative B, is $4.48 million.

The modifications under consideration to the Cypremort Improvements project are consistent with the restoration alternatives selected in the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Final Programmatic Damage Assessment and Restoration Plan/Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PDARP/PEIS).

Public Comment and Webinar

The public is encouraged to review and comment on the draft plan. The public comment period will begin on April 20, 2020 and extend through May 20, 2020. Comments may be made online, by mail, or during the public webinar.

Atlanta, GA 30345

We will hold a public webinar on April 28, 2020 at 12:00 pm CT. We will present the draft plan and take written comments submitted through the webinar.

Draft Supplemental Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment for the Cypremort Point State Park Improvements Project Modifications
Cypremort Point State Park Improvements Project Modifications Fact Sheet English
Cypremort Point State Park Improvements Project Modifications Fact Sheet Vietnamese

The Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group has approved the Final Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment #6: Restore and Conserve Wetlands, Coastal, and Nearshore Habitats. We released the draft restoration plan on December 20, 2019 and accepted public comment through January 21, 2020. The final plan includes three projects, which together, will create or restore more than 1,900 acres of marsh, beach, and dune habitat and protect more than 11.5 miles of shoreline:

  • West Grand Terre Beach Nourishment and Stabilization project: Creates and restores beach habitat, dune habitat, and intertidal marsh habitat and protects shoreline along Barataria Pass and Barataria Bay on West Grand Terre Island in Jefferson and Plaquemines Parishes. The estimated cost of the project is $92,500,000.
  • Golden Triangle Marsh Creation project: Restores approximately 774 acres of broken marsh and open water through marsh creation to help buffer storm surge and provide estuarine habitat for Lake Borgne in Orleans and St. Bernard Parishes. The estimated cost of the project is $50,000,000.
  • Biloxi Marsh Living Shoreline project: Creates oyster barrier reef along eastern shore of Biloxi Marsh to provide oyster habitat, reduce erosion, and prevent further marsh deterioration in Jefferson Parish. The estimated cost of this project is $66,600,000.

The selected projects are intended to continue the process of using restoration funding to restore and conserve wetlands, coastal, and nearshore habitats injured by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The total estimated cost of the selected projects is approximately $209 million.

Final Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment #6: Restore and Conserve Wetlands, Coastal, and Nearshore Habitats

Final RPEA 6 Appendices

After consideration of public comments we received, Louisiana’s Phase 2 Restoration Plan/Environmental Assessment #1.3 (PDF, 149 pages) is now finalized. Released as a draft in November 2019, the plan includes a bird restoration project on Rabbit Island, and a habitat restoration project at Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve.

The final approved combined cost of the projects is approximately $37 million. These costs cover engineering and design, construction, monitoring and adaptive management, and operations and maintenance.

  • The Rabbit Island project will restore 87.8 acres of the island’s original 200-acre footprint. The project will help provide more habitat for birds by raising the elevation of Rabbit Island using dredged material from the Calcasieu Ship Channel. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $16.5 million.
  • The shoreline protection project at Jean Lafitte will install a rock breakwater along the eastern shorelines of Lake Salvador to improve habitat for submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV). The breakwater will include several openings to improve fish passage and water quality behind the structure. Implementation is proposed in two increments, the northern and the southern portions of the affected shorelines. In the Phase 2 Restoration Plan #1.3, implementation of only the southern portion is proposed. The estimated cost for the southern portion of this project is approximately $20.5 million.

Both projects included in this plan are components of larger restoration strategies and were approved for engineering and design in the 2017 Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group Final Restoration Plan #1. This final plan is consistent with the Trustees’ programmatic restoration plan.

Final Restoration Plan/Environmental Assessment #1.3: Rabbit Island Restoration Project and Shoreline Protection at Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve Project

As evaluated in the Final Supplemental Environmental Assessment for the Point-aux-Chenes WMA Recreational Use Project (PDF, 43 pages), one component of the overall project, the boat launch for pirogues, kayaks, and other non-motorized vessels, will be moved from one location to another. The new location, on top of the Terrebonne Parish 4-3C Levee, provides access to tidally influenced brackish and intermediate marsh without requiring clearing of vegetation or causing adverse effects to sensitive habitats. No additional funds will be needed to implement this change.

This Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment was released for public comment in January 2020.

The Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group is considering several restoration projects to restore for injuries to marine mammals and oysters.  Those projects are included in a draft restoration plan now open for public comment for 30 days through April 20, 2020. The trustees are also holding a public webinar on the plan on April 8. The plan, fact sheets in English and Vietnamese, and the executive summary in Vietnamese are all below.

The plan, “Draft Restoration Plan/Environmental Assessment #5: Living Coastal and Marine Resources – Marine Mammals and Oysters” (PDF, 218 pages), includes one preferred marine mammal project, and three preferred oyster projects.

Marine Mammal Restoration

The preferred project for marine mammal restoration will increase capacity for marine mammal stranding response along the Louisiana coast. It proposes enhancing the Louisiana Marine Mammal Stranding Network to enable more rapid responses to injured and dead dolphins and whales, and better understand the causes of death and illness by:

  • Hiring a Louisiana-based Stranding Coordinator that will build partnerships and conduct outreach
  • Providing additional infrastructure, equipment, and supplies needed to facilitate stranding response and improve rehabilitation capabilities (expected cost: $3,095,628).

Oyster Restoration

There are three preferred projects for oysters:

  • The Enhancing Oyster Recovery Using Brood Reef Project will construct a network of spawning stock oyster reefs to increase spawning oyster populations and offset impacts through construction of two reefs in the Lake Machais/Mozambique Point area and two in the Petit Pass/Bay Boudreaux area; and construction of up to 20 reefs in Chandeleur Sound (expected cost: $9,701,447).
  • The Cultch Plant Oyster Restoration Project will create oyster reefs through placement of limestone at a planting density of up to 200 tons per acre at select locations, with harvest closed until performance criteria are met (expected cost: $10,070,000).
  • The Hatchery-based Oyster Restoration Project will provide funding to support continued operations at the Michael C. Voisin Oyster Hatchery in Grand Isle, Louisiana with spat-on-shell deployment of hatchery-produced oysters onto existing shell substrate in public oyster seeding grounds that are low-producing or in need of rehabilitation (expected cost: $5,850,000).

We may select one or more of these projects for implementation.

Funding for oyster restoration under the preferred alternatives above is a commitment of all remaining dollars for oyster restoration in the Louisiana Restoration Area.  The programmatic structure of the proposed oyster cultch and brood reef projects should allow the trustees to continue to construct specific reef sites in the future. Additionally, the trustees may also propose projects in the future that benefit oysters through the wetlands, coastal, and nearshore habitats restoration allocation as described in the 2016 Programmatic Restoration Plan.

Public Comment and Webinar

The public is encouraged to review and comment on the draft plan through April 20, 2020 by submitting comments online, by mail, or during the public webinar.

We will hold a public webinar on April 8, 2020 at 4:00 pm CT. We will present the draft plan and take written comments submitted through the webinar.

Documents

The Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group is considering design alternatives for the Large-Scale Barataria Marsh Creation: Upper Barataria Component project. The preferred design alternative, included in a draft restoration plan now open for public comment for 30 days until April 20, 2020, would create 1,207 acres of intertidal marsh in Upper Barataria Bay. The trustees will hold a public webinar to present the plan on April 2, 2020. The plan, fact sheets in English and Vietnamese, and the executive summary in Vietnamese are all below.

The plan, Draft Phase II Restoration Plan/Environmental Assessment #3.3 (PDF, 155 pages) includes evaluation of three design alternatives for the Upper Barataria marsh creation project. The preferred alternative represents a balance among the area of marsh being created, construction time required, and cost. The estimated total cost for the preferred alternative is approximately $176,000,000.

The project was initially evaluated for engineering and design funding in the 2018 Strategic Restoration Plan to help compensate the public for injuries to wetlands, coastal, and nearshore habitats in the Barataria Basin, where the greatest oiling impacts from the Deepwater Horizon spill occurred.

Public Comment Period and Webinar

Public comments will be accepted for 30 days through April 20, 2020, and we will hold a public webinar on April 2, 2020. We encourage you to review and comment on the draft plan by submitting comments online, by mail, or during the webinar.

We will conduct a public webinar on April 2, 2020 at 4:00 pm CT. We will present the draft plan and take written comments submitted through the webinar.

The presentation will be posted on the web shortly after the webinar is conducted.

Documents

The Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group has released a draft supplemental environmental assessment (pdf 43 pg) proposing changes to the Point-Aux-Chenes Wildlife Management Area (PACWMA) Recreational Use Enhancement Project. The original project was approved in the July 2018 Final Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment #4. If approved, one component of the overall project, the pirogue (i.e., small boat) launch, would be moved from one part of the PACWMA to another. No additional funds would be needed to implement this change.

We invite you to comment on the draft supplemental environmental assessment through March 2, 2020.

Public comment can be submitted online or by U.S. Mail:

Download the Plan

The Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group has released a draft supplemental environmental assessment for the Wetlands Center Project Modification.

Public Comment Period: December 23, 2019 – January 21, 2020

Comments on this Draft Supplemental EA can be submitted during the comment period by one of following methods:

Online: http://www.gulfspillrestoration.noaa.gov/restoration-areas/louisiana

By mail (hard copy), addressed to:

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
P.O. Box 29649
Atlanta, Georgia 30345

Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment for the Wetlands Center Project Modification

The Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group has released a draft restoration plan that proposes three restoration projects for the Wetlands, Coastal, and Nearshore Habitats restoration type. The Trustees are hosting a webinar January  8, 2020, and we’re inviting the public to comment on the plan until January 21.

Together, the proposed projects would create or restore more than 1,900 acres of marsh, beach , and dune habitat and protect more than 11.5 miles of shoreline. The total estimated cost is approximately $209 million.

Draft Plan Summary

The “Draft Restoration Plan and Environmental Analysis #6: Restore and Conserve Wetlands, Coastal, and Nearshore Habitat” (PDF, 365 pages) evaluates four restoration projects; the three preferred by the Trustees are:

  • West Grand Terre Beach Nourishment and Stabilization: Creates and restores beach habitat, dune habitat, and intertidal marsh habitat and protects shoreline along Barataria Pass and Barataria Bay on West Grand Terre Island in Jefferson and Plaquemines Parishes. The estimated cost of the project is $92,500,000.
  • Golden Triangle Marsh Creation: Restores approximately 774 acres of broken marsh and open water through marsh creation to help buffer storm surge and provide estuarine habitat for Lake Borgne in Orleans and St. Bernard Parishes. The estimated cost of the project is $50,000,000.
  • Biloxi Marsh Living Shoreline: Creates oyster barrier reef along eastern shore of Biloxi Marsh to provide oyster habitat, reduce erosion, and prevent further marsh deterioration in Jefferson Parish. The estimated cost of this project is $66,600,000.

We may select one or more of these for implementation.

Public Comment Period and Webinar

Public comments will be accepted through January 21, 2020. Public comments can be submitted online and through the mail.

We will conduct a public webinar on January 8, 2020  at 12:00 noon CT. Comments may be provided by the public during the webinar.

The presentation will be posted on the web shortly after the webinar is conducted.

Louisiana Draft Restoration Plan #6
Louisiana Draft Restoration Plan #6 Fact Sheet in English
Louisiana Draft Restoration Plan #6 Fact Sheet in Vietnamese; tiếng Việt

The Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group has prepared the Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group Draft Restoration Plan/Environmental Assessment #1.3: Rabbit Island Restoration and Shoreline Protection at Jean Lafitte Historical National Park and Preserve (Phase 2 RP/EA #1.3) proposing construction activities to help restore injured resources under two restoration types identified in the Final PDARP/PEIS: “birds” and “habitat projects on federally managed lands”. The two projects were approved for engineering and design (E&D) in a 2017 restoration plan entitled Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group Final Restoration Plan #1: Restoration of Wetlands, Coastal, and Nearshore Habitats; Habitat Projects on Federally Managed Lands; and Birds (Phase 1 RP #1).

The Phase 2 RP/EA #1.3 analyzes design alternatives for the two projects and proposes a preferred design alternative for construction of each. The proposed Rabbit Island project would meet the goal of restoring and conserving birds by restoring 87.8 acres of the island’s original 200-acre footprint for bird habitat. This would be done by raising the elevation of Rabbit Island using dredged fill material from the Calcasieu Ship Channel as the borrow source area. The proposed Jean Lafitte project would protect the shoreline and provide conditions for submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) to thrive, a nearly continuous rock breakwater would be implemented, with rock elbows protecting fish gaps and existing infrastructure along the eastern shorelines of Lake Cataouatche, Lake Salvador, and Bayou Bardeaux in the Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve. The northern portion of the rock breakwater would extend approximately 5.3 miles from Bayou Verret to tie into an existing riprap shoreline protection project at Lake Salvador near Couba Island with canal openings and pipeline right-of-way (ROW) access where needed. The southern portion of the proposed rock breakwater would tie into the southernmost end of the pre-existing riprap shoreline protection and extend approximately 2.2 miles to the area near Isle Bonne with pipeline ROW access where necessary. In Phase 2 RP/EA #1.3, the LA TIG is proposing to fund and implement only the southern portion at this time.

The LA TIG will host a public webinar on December 2, 2019, at 4:00 p.m. CST. The public may register for the webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/576465552592329228. After registering, participants will receive a confirmation email with instructions for joining the webinar. You may submit comments on the draft Phase 2 RP/EA #1.3 by one of the following methods:

  • Via U.S. Mail:  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, P.O. Box 29649, Atlanta, GA 30345.  To be considered, mailed comments must be postmarked on or before the comment deadline.
  • During the public webinar: Written comments may be provided by the public during the webinar.

We welcome comments on Phase 2 RP/EA #1.3 and will consider public comments received on or before December 20, 2019. After the public comment period ends, the LA TIG will review, consider, and address public comments before releasing a final plan and environmental assessment.

Draft Restoration Plan/Environmental Assessment #1.3: Rabbit Island Restoration and Shoreline Protection at Jean Lafitte Historical National Park and Preserve (Phase 2 RP/EA #1.3)

Rabbit Island Restoration and Shoreline Protection at Jean Lafitte Historical National Park and Preserve Fact Sheet

The Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group has released the Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group Draft Restoration Plan/Environmental Assessment #1.2: Barataria Basin Ridge and Marsh Creation Project Spanish Pass Increment and Lake Borgne Marsh Creation Project Increment One (Phase 2 RP/EA #1.2), proposing construction activities for the restoration of wetlands, coastal, and nearshore habitats injured as a result of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill. The two projects were approved for engineering and design (E&D) in a 2017 restoration plan entitled Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group Final Restoration Plan #1: Restoration of Wetlands, Coastal, and Nearshore Habitats; Habitat Projects on Federally Managed Lands; and Birds (Phase 1 RP #1). The Phase 2 RP/EA #1.2 analyzes design alternatives for the two projects and proposes a preferred design alternative for construction of each. We invite comments on the draft Phase 2 RP/EA #1.2.

The LA TIG will host a public webinar on October 28, 2019, at 4:00 p.m. CST. The public may register for the webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4633351197181038605.

After registering, participants will receive a confirmation email with instructions for joining the webinar. The presentation will be posted on the web shortly after the webinar is conducted.

You may submit comments on the draft Phase 2 RP/EA #1.2 by one of the following methods:

  • Via U.S. Mail:  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, P.O. Box 29649, Atlanta, GA 30345. To be considered, mailed comments must be postmarked on or before the comment deadline.
  • During the public webinar: Written comments may be provided during the webinar.

We will consider public comments on the draft Phase 2 RP/EA #1.2 received on or before November 18, 2019. After the public comment period ends, the LA TIG will review, consider, and address public comments before releasing a final plan and environmental assessment.

Draft Phase 2 Restoration Plan/Environmental Assessment #1.2: Spanish Pass Ridge and Marsh Creation Project and Lake Borgne Marsh Creation Project

Spanish Pass and Lake Borgne Fact Sheet

The Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group has released a Final supplemental restoration plan proposing changes to the Lake Charles Science Center and Educational Complex project, previously approved in the July 2018 Final Restoration Plan #2.

Final Supplemental Restoration Plan: Changes to the Lake Charles Science Center and Educational Complex

The Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group has released a draft supplemental restoration plan proposing changes to the Lake Charles Science Center and Educational Complex project, previously approved in the July 2018 Final Restoration Plan #2. If approved, the project site would be updated to co-locate the future science center with the Lake Charles Children’s Museum at the planned Port Wonder Facility, a future education and recreation development.

The Trustees notified the public of the considered changes in October 2018 and are soliciting public comment on the draft supplemental restoration plan until May 20, 2019. We will also hold a public meeting in Lake Charles on May 8.

Following the original approval of the project, stakeholders in Lake Charles requested that the Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group consider co-locating the Science Center with the planned Children’s Museum. The move would offer synergies between the two, potentially enhancing the center’s visibility, accessibility, and overall opportunities for the public to play and learn in one centralized area. The preferred alternative, with the same project scope as the original, would include a 6,900 square foot science center operated by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, along with 8,800 additional square feet of space shared with the museum.

Public comment can be submitted online or by U.S. Mail:

Online Address: https://parkplanning.nps.gov/LARPSCEC

Mail Address:

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
P.O. Box 29649
Atlanta, GA 30345

Draft Supplemental Restoration Plan: Changes to the Lake Charles Science Center and Educational Complex

Lake Charles Science Center and Educational Complex Fact Sheet

The Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group has released its Final Phase 2 Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment #1.1: Queen Bess Island Restoration (PDF, 77 pages). The plan is consistent with the Trustees’ Programmatic Restoration Plan and includes activities for restoring natural resources and services injured or lost in Louisiana due to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

The Queen Bess Island Draft Restoration Plan evaluated two design alternatives for restoration of bird habitat, plus a no action alternative. The preferred alternative would create 30 acres of brown pelican habitat and 7 acres of tern and skimmer habitat. The Trustees presented the draft at a public meeting held on January 3, 2019, and collected public comments through January 22, 2019. After consideration of the comments received, the Trustees selected the preferred alternative and completed the final plan. The total estimated cost of the project is $18.71 million. This includes an estimated $2 million in engineering and design and $16.71 million for construction, maintenance, monitoring, adaptive management, and any future engineering and design costs required.

Final Phase 2 Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment #1.1: Queen Bess Island Restoration

The Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group has released its Draft Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment #1.1: Restoration of Queen Bess Island. The draft plan is consistent with the Trustees’ Programmatic Restoration Plan and proposes activities for restoring natural resources and services injured or lost as a result in Louisiana caused by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

We will hold a public meeting on January 3, 2019 at 9:30 a.m., in association with the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission meeting at the Wildlife and Fisheries Headquarters Building, 200 Quail Drive, Baton Rouge, LA, 70808. Verbal comments of the draft restoration plan will be taken during this meeting.

Comments can be submitted online or mailed:

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
P.O. Box 49567
Atlanta, Georgia 30345

The draft plan is available for public review and comment through January 22, 2019. After the public comment period ends, the LA TIG will review, consider, and address public comments before releasing a final plan and environmental assessment.

Public Comment: December 7, 2018 – January 22, 2019

Draft Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment #1.1: Restoration of Queen Bess Island
Draft Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment #1.1: Fact Sheet

This document, Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group Draft Supplemental Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment for the Elmer’s Island Access Project Modification (Supplemental RP/EA), was prepared by the Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group (LA TIG) to assess the environmental impacts from the modification of a proposed project that was included in the “Draft Restoration Plan/ Environmental Assessment #2: Provide and Enhance Recreational Opportunities” (Draft RP/EA #2), which was released in December 2017 for public comment

In response to the public comments received on the Elmer’s Island Access alternative in the Draft RP/EA #2, the LA TIG modified the project scope and design. Two alternatives to the original scope and design are described in Chapter 2. As a result, and in compliance with NEPA, the LA TIG prepared this Supplemental RP/EA to describe those changes and their environmental effects.

Public Comment: May 21, 2018 – June 20, 2018

Draft Supplemental Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment for the Elmer’s Island Access Project Modification

The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group (Louisiana TIG) has released the Final Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment #4: Nutrient Reduction (Nonpoint Source) and Recreational Use. This Final Restoration Plan describes and proposes restoration project alternatives considered by the Louisiana TIG to improve water quality by reducing nutrients from nonpoint sources and to compensate for recreational use services lost as a result of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Final Restoration Plan #4
Final Restoration Plan #4: Appendices A-G
Final Restoration Plan #4: Executive Summary

The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group (Louisiana TIG) has released the Draft Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment #4: Nutrient Reduction (Nonpoint Source) and Recreational Use. This Draft Restoration Plan describes and proposes restoration project alternatives considered by the Louisiana TIG to improve water quality by reducing nutrients from nonpoint sources and to compensate for recreational use services lost as a result of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Public Comment: April 20, 2018 – May 21, 2018

Click here to access the online comment portal on the National Park Services website.

Recreational Use Restoration
The Deepwater Horizon spill oiled shorelines and resulted in the closure of waterways, parks, and other coastal areas in Louisiana resulting in decreased access to recreational fishing and camping, as well as other outdoor activities which diminished the public’s recreational opportunities and use of natural coastal resources.
To help restore those losses, we are proposing approximately $38 million in project alternatives which emphasize the creation and enhancement of recreational opportunities, including:

  • Fishing, beach-going, camping, and boating;
  • Public access to natural resources for recreational use;
  • Infrastructure for improved of recreational experiences; and
  • Educational and outreach components to help encourage the use and stewardship of natural resources.

Nutrient Reduction Restoration Strategies
Excess nutrients flowing into Louisiana’s coastal estuaries cause harmful algal blooms and oxygen-depleted water, negatively impacting spawning of our fisheries’ habitats and food sources already injured by the 2010 oil spill.
We are proposing approximately $9.5 million in project alternatives designed to help restore and enhance water quality in Louisiana’s coastal watersheds by reducing nutrient and nonpoint source pollution runoff on agricultural lands, focusing on the following strategies:

  • Nutrient Reduction on Dairy Farms (Two projects in three parishes)
  • Nutrient Reduction on Crop and Grazing Lands
  • Winter Water Holding on Cropland

Public Meeting
The Trustees will hold a public meeting to facilitate public review and comment on the Draft Restoration Plan at the Tulane River and Coastal Center on April 24, 2018; Open House 5:30 p.m., Meeting 6:00 p.m.; 1370 Port of New Orleans Place, New Orleans, LA 70130.

Draft Restoration Plan #4
Draft Restoration Plan #4: Appendices A-E
Draft Restoration Plan #4: Executive Summary
Draft Restoration Plan #4: Fact Sheet
Draft Restoration Plan #4: Vietnamese Fact Sheet

The LA TIG has prepared this Fianl SRP/EA to analyze strategic restoration alternatives associated with the restoration of wetlands, coastal, and nearshore habitat resources and services in the Barataria Basin, which was heavily impacted by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and associated response efforts (DWH oil spill).

Final Restoration Plan #3

Final Restoration Plan #3: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI)

Final Restoration Plan #3: Executive Summary

Final Restoration Plan #3: Vietnamese translation of Chapter 7 of the plan

The LA TIG has prepared this draft SRP/EA to analyze strategic restoration alternatives associated with the restoration of wetlands, coastal, and nearshore habitat resources and services in the Barataria Basin, which was heavily impacted by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and associated response efforts (DWH oil spill). This Phase I SRP/EA also selects particular projects for further restoration planning and detailed environmental review in Phase II restoration plans.

Draft Restoration Plan #3

The Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group released its Final Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment #2: Provide and Enhance Recreational Opportunities. This plan describes and selects projects intended to restore for lost recreational use opportunities caused by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Final Restoration Plan #2

The LA TIG has prepared this draft RP/EA to inform the public about DWH NRDA restoration planning efforts and to seek public comment on the proposed alternatives for engineering and design, and implementation, in this RP/EA.

Draft Restoration Plan #2

On January 20, 2017, the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group (Louisiana TIG) released the DWH Final Restoration Plan #1: Restoration of Wetlands, Coastal, and Nearshore Habitats; Habitat Projects on Federally Managed Lands; and Birds.

Final Restoration Plan #1

The Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group (Louisiana TIG) prepared this Draft Restoration Plan to inform the public about DWH NRDA restoration planning efforts and to seek public comment on six preferred restoration alternatives proposed for engineering and design (E&D). In identifying proposed projects for this Draft RP, the Louisiana TIG considered the OPA screening criteria, the Restoration Goals and other criteria identified by the Trustees in the PDARP/PEIS, the contents of Louisiana’s 2012 Comprehensive Master Plan for a Sustainable Coast (Coastal Master Plan), the need to provide restoration benefits across the many Louisiana basins impacted by the DWH oil spill, input from the public, and the current and future availability of funds under the DWH oil spill NRDA settlement payment schedule.
Draft Restoration Plan #1: Restoration of Wetlands, Coastal, and Nearshore Habitats; Habitat Projects on Federally Managed Lands; and Birds.